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: [1] 2 3

Unknown
12-10-10, 06:57 PM
:rolleyes:
:1002:
figures of speech








12-10-10, 07:51 PM
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unknown..

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night queen
12-10-10, 08:43 PM

Unknown
12-10-10, 08:59 PM
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night queen
12-10-10, 09:09 PM



(the eagle)

Glory days
13-10-10, 03:20 PM
45

123
13-10-10, 08:10 PM
45



eagle

eagle

:smile13:

Unknown
13-10-10, 08:51 PM




The Eagle



The main idea is :describe the Eagle and his life






This poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson is divided into two stanzas with three lines each. The rhyme scheme is AAA BBB.






The meaning of words:





Clasp:to hold someone or something tightly in your hands or arms.


Crag: a steep, rough rock on a hill or mountain.


Crooked: 1) not straight or even.


2) Not honest.


Azure:blue.


Wrinkled: a small line in sth, often one on the skin of your face which you get as you grow older.


Beneath:in, at or to a lower position.


Thunderbolt: a flash of lightning that hits something.


Falls: waterfall.







Paraphrasing:




He clasps the crag with crooked hands




The pronoun (He) refers to the eagle. It is personification. We have also personification in the word (hand). It is a human quality by giving him a hand. "'Crooked hands" emphasize that the man is an older man. The poet describes the eagle as an old man who holds the crag with not straight hands. The imagery of touching is (clasps, hands). This imagery shows image of power and stability.




Close to the sun in lonely lands




He (the eagle) lives in a very high place close to the sun (hyperbole) and he does not need anyone while the land lonely without him. The poet tries to emphasize how high the places that the eagle lives in. "lonely lands" emphasize the ability of the eagle to live a lone by him. "Close to the sun" is imagery of sight.




Ringed with the azure world, he stands





He like a king, he ware a ring around him. (Ringed) emphasize how high the eagle is and how powerful he is. "Ringed with the azure world" is more general metaphor where the sky is being compared to a blue (azure) world that surrounds the eagle. (Azure) is imagery of sight.




The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls




All those waves we are scared of, to him it is only lines and their movement is very slow. (Crawls) is a personification, giving the human quality of crawling. "Wrinkled sea" symbolize that the man is an older man and here there are figure of speech and imagery of hearing, sight, smelling, and tasting the salt from the sea.




He watches from his mountain walls




The mountain themselves ices his home and he is standing on the mountain watching because of his sharp sight. "Mountain walls" is imagery of sight.




And like a thunderbolt he falls




This verse emphasize his speed and power and we have a simile here because the word (like). It is comparison between the eagle and the thunderbolt in speed and power. "Like a thunderbolt he falls" is imagery of sight and hearing.






Theme: (freedom)




The bird soaring in the sky has always been used as an example of freedom from the bonds of gravity, which anchors plants, people, and most animals to the earth. The eagle in this poem is pictured close to the sunanother symbol of highflying freedom that is not controlled by the limitations of the earths atmosphere. This area of the sky, just inside of and barely contained by the azure world of outer space, is what is meant by lonely lands. Loneliness implies detachment or a lack of responsibility to any other thing.





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14-10-10, 03:00 AM


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14-10-10, 12:35 PM
the sick rose by william blake


"First, Blake addresses the rose as if it were a living person with feelings, rather than simply a flower, he gives it human qualities, or anthromorphises the flower to make it more real. He writes, "O Rose thou art sick" (Blake). He may have actually written the poem for a sick friend or loved one, because it certainly illustrates grief at death. Then again, the poem could have been written over the loss, or "death" of love, for the foreboding tone and reference to the "dark secret love" (Blake) of the worm could mean that the rose has found another love, and the speaker is grieving over the loss of love, rather than the loss of life. It clearly portrays the pain of dying on the person, but also on the loved ones who surround the "rose." It is important to note that the author uses this rose, which is a universal symbol of love, both as a flower, and a symbolic sign of love and relationships."


poem
http://alfrasha.maktoob.com//redirectLink.php?link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eliteskills .com%2Fc%2F12338

http://plagiarist.com/poetry/1852/comments/

http://alfrasha.maktoob.com//redirectLink.php?link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.academon.co m%2Flib%2Fpaper%2F56366.html

14-10-10, 12:51 PM
The Sick Rose"
O Rose thou art sick.
The invisible worm,
That flies in the night
In the howling storm:

Has found out thy bed
Of crimson joy:
And his dark secret love
Does thy life destroy.

Summary
The speaker, addressing a rose, informs it that it is sick. An "invisible" worm has stolen into its bed in a "howling storm" and under the cover of night. The "dark secret love" of this worm is destroying the rose's life.
Form
The two quatrains of this poem rhyme ABCB. The ominous rhythm of these short, two-beat lines contributes to the poem's sense of foreboding or dread and complements the unflinching directness with which the speaker tells the rose she is dying.
Commentary
While the rose exists as a beautiful natural object that has become infected by a worm, it also exists as a literary rose, the conventional symbol of love. The image of the worm resonates with the Biblical serpent and also suggests a phallus. Worms are quintessentially earthbound, and symbolize death and decay. The "bed" into which the worm creeps denotes both the natural flowerbed and also the lovers' bed. The rose is sick, and the poem implies that love is sick as well. Yet the rose is unaware of its sickness. Of course, an actual rose could not know anything about its own condition, and so the emphasis falls on the allegorical suggestion that it is love that does not recognize its own ailing state. This results partly from the insidious secrecy with which the "worm" performs its work of corruption--not only is it invisible, it enters the bed at night. This secrecy indeed constitutes part of the infection itself. The "crimson joy" of the rose connotes both sexual pleasure and shame, thus joining the two concepts in a way that Blake thought was perverted and unhealthy. The rose's joyful attitude toward love is tainted by the aura of shame and secrecy that our culture attaches to love.

Unknown
14-10-10, 01:10 PM
The sick rose

15-10-10, 06:27 PM
the sick rose by william blake


"First, Blake addresses the rose as if it were a living person with feelings, rather than simply a flower, he gives it human qualities, or anthromorphises the flower to make it more real. He writes, "O Rose thou art sick" (Blake). He may have actually written the poem for a sick friend or loved one, because it certainly illustrates grief at death. Then again, the poem could have been written over the loss, or "death" of love, for the foreboding tone and reference to the "dark secret love" (Blake) of the worm could mean that the rose has found another love, and the speaker is grieving over the loss of love, rather than the loss of life. It clearly portrays the pain of dying on the person, but also on the loved ones who surround the "rose." It is important to note that the author uses this rose, which is a universal symbol of love, both as a flower, and a symbolic sign of love and relationships."


poem
http://alfrasha.maktoob.com//redirectLink.php?link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eliteskills .com%2Fc%2F12338

http://plagiarist.com/poetry/1852/comments/

http://alfrasha.maktoob.com//redirectLink.php?link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.academon.co m%2Flib%2Fpaper%2F56366.html



16-10-10, 02:25 AM


16-10-10, 03:45 PM



L O S T ~
17-10-10, 03:10 PM
..
..1
..

123
17-10-10, 08:43 PM
The Eagle



The Eagle:smile15:


17-10-10, 08:53 PM

<

Unknown
18-10-10, 07:28 PM

...

Love me
18-10-10, 08:22 PM
^^
..

123
21-10-10, 11:02 AM
444

21-10-10, 11:06 AM
2 / /

the eagle
,


the pronoun he refers to the eagle ,it is personification.


the clasps and crag and crooked
it is alliteration

the rhyme scheme is aaa bbb

,

21-10-10, 11:15 AM
/
close to the sun in lonely lands
irony

..



ringed with the azure world ,he stands
personification






theme
freedom
and
describe
and action

21-10-10, 12:03 PM
the mean idea,show you the eagle and describ

also , the eagle like old man holding on to life


21-10-10, 12:11 PM
The eagle is a poem in which show an eagle as a poerful animal, powerful and imporant who is looking and observing his "kingdom",then he falls from his peak. this can mean two things one that he is very acurate and prises because it went to scoop down its pray or that something went wrong with the eagle . Most probably the poet is telling us that man shouldnt interfear with nature as it can cause grat harm to this powerful craeture

/

21-10-10, 12:19 PM


He (the eagle) lives in a very high place close to the sun (hyperbole) and he does not need anyone while the land lonely without him. The poet tries to emphasize how high the places that the eagle lives in. "lonely lands" emphasize the ability of the eagle to live a lone by him. "Close to the sun" is imagery of sight.


He like a king, he ware a ring around him. (Ringed) emphasize how high the eagle is and how powerful he is. "Ringed with the azure world" is more general ****phor where the sky is being compared to a blue (azure) world that surrounds the eagle. (Azure) is imagery of sight.

21-10-10, 01:03 PM
, :)

http://www.imam1.com/vb/showthread.php?t=111048

http://www.imam1.com/vb/showthread.php?t=134246

21-10-10, 02:27 PM

Glory days
21-10-10, 04:03 PM

123
21-10-10, 06:45 PM

21-10-10, 07:32 PM
!!


The Chimney Sweeper, by William



, !!

, !!

:( !

22-10-10, 11:02 AM

㿿

Unknown
22-10-10, 02:30 PM
The sick Rose
By willliam Blake



ORose,thou art sick
Orose< tells us that the rose is not real but it symbolise 4 something
we use it to talk abuot dead person,or unhumen ,it comes from the heart he feels ahuge heart break
he feels sorry for this sick rose ,
thou :you are



The invisible worm
killing desease eating up slowly

that flies in the night
refer to the worm or the man
it show up or show in the night he dosnt want any one to see him

In the howling storm
howling means :strong , loud



Has found out thy bed
, bed symbolise:home ,weekness
thy:your




of crimson joy :

and she is in a deep love



and his dark secret love
dark :maybe it is a crime or evil
and here we know that the the worm is man from >>he


does thy life destroy
does means that it is in present tense it would happen again and again



first the speaker adres nonhumen or dead person and he is speaking to him which is the rose *
worms:they hurt people ,they go to the plant and from inside they hurt it and eat and the flowes look like a fresh flower andno one knowes that she is suffering *
<<it flies in the night<< cause it doesnt wat anu one to see it ,
in a howling storm no one hears the sound it makes also, the screeming of the flowers and that shows us it is doing spmething wrong cause it choose this situaiton


dark :because people are sleeping he doesnt want them to see him
he is a good man he want to be like that an being a secret
it is a very limited realationship he dont want the world to know



hidden symbolic:
realaitonship between man &women
she has been affected by him.he is invisible ,he doesnt show him self even she doesnt see him but she knows he is here and she feels in love with him in a dark,secert,love
secret:it is a wrong
women >rose

she driven a ay on apatien

crimson joy:she is looking 4 his love he start eating slowly and killing her inside
it is not a clear love she has desroyed and died

symbols
rose:patient women,fresh women
worm:male(bad ,unfaithfull,evil,lair,districtive,cheating,
Jealous friends)
dark:darkness,crime,fair quietness weekness secret
howling:strength,dangerous,fair,anger,desriction,n oise,crime,confusion
storm:destriction.fair, distictive power



Figurs of speech:
The speaker uses obostraphy to adress the rose as it were a humen
The speaker pesonfiese the worm as it were a male or a person
The speaker persofies the rose as it was a women who attacked by a man




metaphore:
The speaker compairs the worm to a bird both fly
The speaker compairs the man to the worm both sly and conny

assonance:
flies and night

allitertion:
does destroy
that the






123
22-10-10, 02:37 PM

123
22-10-10, 02:39 PM



Love me
22-10-10, 03:44 PM
unknown

.....

..

.. :S

Glory days
22-10-10, 08:56 PM





Glory days
22-10-10, 08:57 PM
unknown

.....

..

.. :S

...!.!!!!

Mnolh
22-10-10, 09:13 PM
...





.





(!) (!) (!) (!)



.

( )



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:

( ()





).

.





() () () ()

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.













.




24 ( 6 ) Rhyme scheme
(aabb ccdd eeff gghh iijj kkll )

This poem from songs of innocence ..x

The theme :x

Children abuse by society in the 18th century .x


The subject :x

The young boys work as chimney sweeper .. the speaker is one them his age is 6 _7.x


Paraphrase : x


The first stanza : the speaker told us that when his mother died , he was very young and his father sold him even though his tongue cannot articulate clearly ..and his life became working as chimney sweeper and sleep while he is dirty . x


The second stanza : he said this little Tom is crying because they shave his curly hair , and the innocent boy is trying to comfort his friend and tell him it is good that they shave your head because the dirt will not stick your hair .x
( the ironic discrepancy between the comfort he intends and the lack comfort he actually offers , )x


The third : when Tom was sleeping he dreamed about thousand of sweepers were locked in dusty coffins .x
( he says just 4 names because he remembers just this names ).


The fourth : an angle came with his hand bright key and opened the coffin and released them to a green plain leaping and laughing they became very happy and run to the river washing below sunshine .( coffins of black are the chimney where the boys work in . The angle who released them from the bondage is the benefactor).x


The fifth : they run naked with white and all their bags left behind ,they rise upon clouds and the angle told Tom if you be a good boy God will take care of you ( the coffins are real coffins and angle is one of God's angle who releases the boys

into heaven with the key of death ) .x


the sixth : when Tom wake up and the boys rose in the dark, they took their bags and brushes to work . the morning was cold but Tom was feeling warm and happy because if all do their duty no one need to fear harm ( the irony : the speaker is ironic on the society who took the children and force them to work ) this is hope not a dream x


Figure of speech :x

In line 3 (onomatopoeia).x

In line 6like a lambs (simile) in the same line(visual imagery ).x

In line 11 .. thousand ( overstatement ).x

.. In line12 (visual imagery )x

and black (metaphor).x

In line 15(visual imagery ).x

In line 21 .. (visual imagery ).x

In line 24 (irony : there is a contrast between comfortable life the boy hope and luck of his comfort during his actually life).x

The dream is a symbol of hope in the future.x


Repetition of alliteration :x

Could_ cry ,,leaping_ laughing ,,bags _brushes,, x

Repetition ofassonance :x

Young_ tongue ,,, weep _sleep ,,lambs _back,, night
sight ,,river_ shine ,,boy _ joy ,, run_ sun_ ,,x


Repetition ofconsonance :x

Weep _sleep_ sweep ,,night _sight _bright ,,,run

sun ,,boy _ joy ,,dark _work. x

Unknown
23-10-10, 05:47 PM




23-10-10, 08:25 PM



!!!

, >


, / /

!

, :o


porphyria's Lover
by ,Robert Browning


*

23-10-10, 08:31 PM
/

123
23-10-10, 09:25 PM



:humm:

Glory days
23-10-10, 09:41 PM
^

24-10-10, 05:51 PM
?

Unknown
24-10-10, 05:57 PM




Mnolh
24-10-10, 07:44 PM
. 441

ym ym
24-10-10, 08:20 PM




the chimmey sweeper


Unlike the one in Songs of Innocence, "The Chimney Sweeper", in Songs of Experience is very dark and pessimistic. This poem also seems to be very judgmental and gives motives for everything, but unlike Song of Innocence, the sweeper in this poem does not free himself from his misery.

In the first two lines, Blake gives us an image of an anguished child in a state of agony or even in a state of corruption. The color black seems to be very important because it is used to represent sin against innocence, the color of the white snow. Blake also shows the same child weeping, when he really means to say sweeping, because that is what has that child in such grief. This stanza ends by someone asking him about his parents, which later end up being responsible for this childs state.

In the second stanza, the child is pictured in a very more happier and playful mood. This soon changes when he decides to tell the stranger more about his parents. They are showed to be punishing their child for being so happy by "clothing in clothes of death and teaching him to sing notes of woe." It is very obvious the sweepers feels hate towards his parents for putting him in such sadness, but instead he chooses to hide it by making himself look happy and satisfied.

It is clear in the last Stanza that Blakes criticizing the Church , especially, and the state for letting a lot of these things happen. During this time many children were dying from being, either, worked to death or from malnutrition. Neither the state or the church did anything to stop this and is obviously why Blake feels so much anger towards them. The sweepers parents are really no help towards their own child. This makes the reader wonder, if they are worshipping god, the source of good doings, why do they chose to ignore their own child. They would rather turn their heads the other way and instead findlove at church.

I think this is a very striking poem. It clearly shows Blakes anger towards society at this time. I also think that he used many of his poems to make people aware of the suffering of people at this time. I also think That he wrote two separate books to give a fuller effect. Songs of Innocence, I think was how people thought that everything was okay. Songs of Experience, in my opinion was to open every ones eyes.
In The Chimney Sweeper from both Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience William Blake uses the colors black and white to describe images within the two poems. The first instance of color is introduced in line 8 of the Songs of Innocence Poem, You know that the soot cannot spoil your white hair. This line introduces the problem that is occurring in the poem, that the chimney sweeper is becoming filthy because of the soot in the chimneys. It may be considered that the job of the chimney sweeper is tainting him. The black soot is dirty and is polluting the chimney weepers clean white hair, the white standing for the purity of the child. Throughout both poems the speakers directly and indirectly use the colors black and white to show images of the chimney sweeper.

Unknown
24-10-10, 08:43 PM
. ):

night queen
24-10-10, 09:37 PM
8888888

24-10-10, 09:39 PM
Mnolh




\
\
=(!!

P!NK
24-10-10, 09:53 PM
443 !

!

L O S T ~
25-10-10, 02:46 AM
. ..
41 +44..
..:)
/
..:(
<< :)

123
25-10-10, 01:42 PM
443 !

!

:humm:

25-10-10, 01:56 PM

Unknown
25-10-10, 06:20 PM
:dance1:

43

Turn it up
25-10-10, 07:00 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssjj0qr_cLg&feature=related


ym ym
26-10-10, 08:08 PM

night queen
26-10-10, 09:25 PM
Mnolh




\
\
=(!!

/

27-10-10, 06:57 PM
...

29-10-10, 05:26 PM
/





:smile13:

:smile13:

29-10-10, 05:53 PM





41

30-10-10, 02:24 PM

30-10-10, 05:51 PM
^ There Is No Frigate Like a Book

ms/rawabi , G 41

30-10-10, 09:33 PM
2
the road not taken

30-10-10, 09:42 PM
^
^
^
!

30-10-10, 10:26 PM
The Road Not Taken
By Robert Frost

/ 46

Glory days
31-10-10, 12:23 AM


....

....

somooo
31-10-10, 10:23 PM
43

31-10-10, 10:44 PM
888
88
8

1
\
<<
<< !!
\
=)
\
=\

31-10-10, 11:17 PM
443 :011:
:1003:

.. ..

P!NK
31-10-10, 11:35 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5140uJOUDE&feature=related

Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken"

01-11-10, 02:52 PM
....... ........ << :1003:

01-11-10, 06:54 PM


, sonnet18

:d

41 /G

02-11-10, 02:36 PM
The Road Not Taken



http://poetrypages.lemon8.nl/life/ro...adnottaken.htm

http://www.suite101.com/content/robe...cky-poem-a8712

figur speech (http://www.frostfriends.org/figurative.html)


sonnet18 (http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/18detail.html)

http://www.shmoop.com/sonnet-18/

(http://www.imam1.com/vb/showthread.php?t=58393) :o

+ , > :smile13: !!

miss ranosh
02-11-10, 08:32 PM


:smile15:

Glory days
04-11-10, 11:57 PM

05-11-10, 05:03 PM
....

Mnolh
05-11-10, 11:17 PM
:rolleyes:

Sonnet 18: (Shakespeare)
Poem:



Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
================================
:
1- simile)).
2- (metaphor ).
3- :-
- (the moon refer to female.)
- ( (The sun refer to male.
------------------------------------------------------

The Form:

A sonnet is a fourteen-line lyric poem. -1
2-It is consisting of ten syllables.
There are octave and a sestet in the poem. 3-
4-The meter is a iambic pentameter.
5- The rhyme scheme are ABABCDCDEFEFGG.




Summary (No:1)
Shakespeare wrote 37plays and 158 sonnet. In sonnet 18 , as well as, in all sonnets. Shakespeare imagine one whom he talks to . That person is side to be a poet who is hand some , and young .The sonnet of Shakespeare deal with different topics of life such as: love, hatred ,life , death , beauty and nature.
---------------------------------------
Shakespeare in first line ask her girlfriend why he can not compare her to a summers day?
In the second line , he began to answer his question, he said, for several reason I can not do this comparison .First of all because you are lover and milder than summers day.

Second, summers strong winds are kill the life such as buds.

Third, ask summers time is short , so we can not enjoy for it along time.

Fourth, summers sometimes has too hot sun.

Fifth, the beauty look at the sun it may hidden by cloudy.
Sixth, this beauty look it may change to bad look ,so this beauty it may decrease step by step to bad look.

Seventh, this changing for sun it cause by natures changing .

Eighth , now he is talking about his girls friends beauty he said, that her beauty will stay as she looks now, also the death it will not be happy if the take you to his world.

After that , he said , these lines will stay for ever no body will forget them because I mentioned you between these lines .

Final couplet :
He said, for his girlfriend this poem will stay for long time like the distance which ,human can live. Also , this poem will make you a life after you death because people will remember you.


Sonnet 18:

Summary:(No:2)

It was written by Shakespeare(1564-1616).
In sonnet 18 we have chokes talking to his beloved. The opening line is one of the most popular verses in English :"Shall I compare you thee to a summers day". The answer is given in the second line "thou art more lovely and more temperate" . The ten lines that follow , give reason for this answer. That his beloved is more beautiful than the spring because the spring "Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May" she is also more beautiful than the sun because he could be" sometimes to hot". She is preferred because her" eternal summer shall not fade". Her beauty is also eternal ,death can not get hold of it "Nor shall death brag thou wand' rest in his shad". That eternal summer, and eternal beauty of his beloved is found , and shaped through the lines of Shakespeares poetry her beauty witchs much higher and more glorious than the spring, summer and the sun is made in "eternal lines" of his poetry . Her beauty will be remembered by all living people "So long as man can breathe or eyes can see/So long lives this ,and this gives life to thee".





Sonnet18:

Summary (No.3)

The speaker opens the poem with a question addressed to the beloved: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" The next eleven lines are devoted to such a comparison. In line 2, the speaker stipulates what mainly differentiates the young man from the summer's day: he is "more lovely and more temperate." Summer's days tend toward extremes: they are shaken by "rough winds"; in them, the sun ("the eye of heaven") often shines "too hot," or too dim. And summer is fleeting: its date is too short, and it leads to the withering of autumn, as "every fair from fair sometime declines." The final quatrain of the sonnet tells how the beloved differs from the summer in that respect: his beauty will last forever ("Thy eternal summer shall not fade...") and never die. In the couplet, the speaker explains how the beloved's beauty will accomplish this feat, and not perish because it is preserved in the poem, which will last forever; it will live "as long as men can breathe or eyes can see."

Glory days
06-11-10, 06:43 PM
^
:D

06-11-10, 06:58 PM
41

<<

06-11-10, 06:58 PM
<<

06-11-10, 07:26 PM
^

:)

07-11-10, 08:56 PM

Mnolh
08-11-10, 03:44 AM

Mnolh
08-11-10, 03:50 AM
:humm: :11icon:

:046:<<<<

<<< :1111:

:smile_crazy:

08-11-10, 06:34 PM
sonnet 18 :smile13: !!!

41

miss ranosh
08-11-10, 11:31 PM


:smile13:

Rittal
09-11-10, 07:15 PM

:smile13:

ym ym
10-11-10, 12:58 AM





FeeFoO
10-11-10, 01:06 AM


:smile13:


:ph34r::304: xD


:011: xD :p

:cool:

17-11-10, 03:06 PM


41 ....

Mnolh
20-11-10, 04:05 AM
^
^
^
:1003:

maya maya
21-11-10, 08:44 PM
[ 45

21-11-10, 10:32 PM
.....

...

Glory days
22-11-10, 01:01 AM
^

24-11-10, 12:25 AM
43 Ͽ

FeeFoO
25-11-10, 06:09 PM
:rolleyes:,,







..

(f)

26-11-10, 03:06 AM
...

29-11-10, 11:44 PM
41 ....

30-11-10, 01:34 AM
43

FeeFoO
30-11-10, 06:39 PM
,, ,,

:cool:



(f)

30-11-10, 06:46 PM
43

..

.

..

30-11-10, 06:47 PM
,, ,,

:cool:



(f)

sonnet 18
By william shakespear

LnOoOsh
30-11-10, 07:47 PM
:/

:/

01-12-10, 02:31 AM

Mnolh
02-12-10, 12:46 AM
Ͽ

LnOoOsh
02-12-10, 04:53 AM
:D

:/

:/

02-12-10, 02:35 PM

16


L_ive
03-12-10, 02:35 PM

Mnolh
03-12-10, 03:06 PM
:1003:

LnOoOsh
03-12-10, 03:42 PM
Golden age ?

:(

03-12-10, 04:35 PM
41

Mnolh
03-12-10, 06:30 PM
ballad of birmingham

03-12-10, 06:55 PM
^^^


globalization
03-12-10, 07:12 PM
the golden age

04-12-10, 07:55 PM

05-12-10, 05:19 PM
41 :1003:

05-12-10, 07:17 PM
..

07-12-10, 03:16 PM
41 :1003:


41

ym ym
07-12-10, 05:29 PM

Glory days
07-12-10, 06:44 PM

king8
07-12-10, 06:46 PM
Ballad of birmingham

Glory days
07-12-10, 06:55 PM
^^ ...

miss ranosh
07-12-10, 07:42 PM
Balled !! :humm:
( paradise lost)

:D



sonnet 18 is shakesearen sonnet discuss that and prove it ?

07-12-10, 07:49 PM
Ballad of birmingham :o

L_ive
07-12-10, 08:23 PM


( )
essay ( ڿ)
:05408:
:1003:
441

07-12-10, 09:46 PM


( )
essay ( ڿ)
:05408:
:1003:
441




globalization
08-12-10, 03:17 PM


L_ive
08-12-10, 05:27 PM
No answer??
??:icon810:??
:MM3golah::sad-smiley-068:

( )

09-12-10, 02:04 PM
overstatment

the road not taken

09-12-10, 02:05 PM

Glory days
10-12-10, 02:46 AM
... ... ...!!!!!!!!


10-12-10, 01:05 PM
ѿ

Mnolh
10-12-10, 03:43 PM



<<<

B.A.A
10-12-10, 04:30 PM


Epic invocation
Paradise Lost by John Milton have an epic invocation
epic invocation Paradise lost epic invocation

10-12-10, 05:48 PM
8


10-12-10, 05:54 PM
Paradise lost (http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/ParadiseLost.html)

, Epic invocation


b.aa

ENGLISH-GIRL
10-12-10, 06:59 PM
45





45


globalization
10-12-10, 07:13 PM
B.A.A
A+

10-12-10, 09:18 PM
irony
and simile
in the road not taken

10-12-10, 11:48 PM

11-12-10, 07:41 PM
:(




:smile4:

11-12-10, 08:29 PM



ENGLISH-GIRL
11-12-10, 09:52 PM
workshop



figures of speech

^_^

12-12-10, 04:42 PM
workshop



figures of speech

^_^




maya maya
12-12-10, 08:54 PM
english girl

3 there is no frigate like a book
metaphor & simile
ok :)

ENGLISH-GIRL
12-12-10, 10:22 PM





^_________^

13-12-10, 02:50 PM
workshop

ym ym
14-12-10, 03:51 PM









Epic invocation
Paradise Lost by John Milton have an epic invocation
epic invocation Paradise lost epic invocation


14-12-10, 07:39 PM
8
epic invocation
paradise lost



maya maya
14-12-10, 08:23 PM

445 figures of speech
group 3 ------------ There is no frigate like a book
and the group members are
1 Muneera Al-Shlash -----------simile , metaphore and personefication
2 Heba Al- skran imagery and symbols
3 Maha Al-mosa conotation and donetation

the other members please take the rest

15-12-10, 11:02 AM


:8:


A+ :)

41 :(

,

(http://www.m5zn.com/share-121410231228056tj4qtboi9) (Figures of Speech.doc - 36 Kb) , (http://www.zshare.net/download/839392558727d174/), ,


:smile13: !


:o

15-12-10, 11:20 AM
8


!

15-12-10, 11:33 AM
^ ,

15-12-10, 04:42 PM


1-(The Eagle ( fouces ,Imagary , meetaphor
2-The sick rose (similar > !
3-There is no frigate like a book > :( !
4-sonnet18 < 16th century ,characterstic of 16th century , 16th century , 18 16 .

.


:(

LnOoOsh
15-12-10, 06:42 PM


1

15-12-10, 11:07 PM
6th century ,characterstic of 16th century








16-12-10, 12:08 AM
<<



..


16-12-10, 12:10 AM
<<

LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 06:28 AM
<<




3 :

1- English sonnet ( Shakespearain sonnet ) =)
2- Italian sonnet
3- Spenserian sonnet


=)

LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 06:30 AM
Definition



Enjambment :- the running over of the sense and grammatical structure from one verse line or couplet to the next without a punctuated pause

16-12-10, 01:50 PM


1-(The Eagle ( fouces ,Imagary , meetaphor
2-The sick rose (similar > !
3-There is no frigate like a book > :( !
4-sonnet18 < 16th century ,characterstic of 16th century , 16th century , 18 16 .

.


:(

ǿ

.

B.A.A
16-12-10, 02:09 PM
888888


LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 02:16 PM







=)

16-12-10, 03:21 PM
the chimney sweeper
ǿ

16-12-10, 03:28 PM
16th century ,characterstic of 16th century



LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 06:12 PM
the chimney sweeper
ǿ






1- the eagle
2- sick rose
3- there is no frigate like a book
4- sonnet 18



1

LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 06:14 PM
16th century ,characterstic of 16th century

















1

16-12-10, 06:49 PM
><




16-12-10, 06:55 PM
THERE is no frigate like a book

To take us lands away,

Nor any coursers like a page

Of prancing poetry.







( )

( )

( ) prancing



frigate



Emily Dickinson is considering the power of a book of poetry whichi is the power of taking us from immidiate surrounding world into a world of immagination. and the power of a page of good poetry as the power of a horse.



This traverse may the poorest take

Without oppress of toll;

How frugal is the chariot

That bears a human soul!













---------------------------







-----------------------

Emily gave us an example of that transfering that we can go through all lands without giving any charges. and these trips won't cost us any money and everybody can go through this.









frigate

coursers

traverse

chariot



LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 07:02 PM
^



!!

LnOoOsh
16-12-10, 07:28 PM
16 Century = Elizabthen age

Named Elizabthen age according to queen Elizabth .


Also it named " golden age " according to the improvments in that time as :-

1- scientific revelation
2- education improvement
3- renaissance
4- trade
5- technological invocation
6- prosperity
7- literary improvement
8- inventions


=)


sick rose

:(

B.A.A
16-12-10, 07:58 PM
:$


16th Cen
named Elizabeth age because the queen Elizabeth was a queen in this time
it also named Golden age
why was called golden age?
1-scinentific revolution= there was a Darwin theory
2-improvment of education = middle class stated to learn
3-renaissance age =queen Elizabth was intersted in theater and leaturater so she was supported there for the theater was improved
4-improvement of trade(busines +sleves
5-technology innovation
6-prosperity =good life


16-12-10, 08:08 PM


16-12-10, 08:36 PM
b a

16-12-10, 08:56 PM
outline
mh.rawabi@yahoo.com

,,, +

16-12-10, 09:39 PM
!! !! :)

16-12-10, 09:44 PM


:8:


A+ :)

41 :(

,

(http://www.m5zn.com/share-121410231228056tj4qtboi9) (Figures of Speech.doc - 36 Kb) , (http://www.zshare.net/download/839392558727d174/), ,


:smile13: !


:o



, ...

16-12-10, 10:51 PM
baa


O rose you are sick

oh rose you are sick
the rose is symbol of beuty youthful women

the invesible worm
that flies in the night
in the howling storm

the invesible worm witch is the symbol of unfethful man in the night in strong storm
in the night because of dark
strong storm give feeling that something bad will happens
storm symbol of unscerity

has found out they bed
of crimson joy

the unfithful man found in her bed
the crimson pleasure

and his dark secret love
does the life destroy

the dark secret love by the unfithful man destroy her life

or
because tht way of love destroy her life






,
.


:

:

.

16-12-10, 10:53 PM
8
><
:$

16-12-10, 10:57 PM
<<

Glory days
16-12-10, 11:06 PM
:

( 1588 1603 ) . . .

...

17-12-10, 11:04 AM
8


> " "
" "

>



""









18
!





><
^_^

17-12-10, 11:19 AM

L_ive
17-12-10, 12:02 PM





P!NK
17-12-10, 12:07 PM
!!!!!!

L_ive
17-12-10, 01:04 PM
sonnet 18 ǿ
:angry4:

Definitions ǿ


<< :876: ( , :l5: , :sad-smiley-002:)

ym ym
17-12-10, 03:10 PM



17-12-10, 06:16 PM
^^^

..

miss ranosh
18-12-10, 11:37 AM




Glory days
18-12-10, 01:31 PM
<< ..

B.A.A
18-12-10, 02:30 PM
..
3






18-12-10, 05:33 PM
,

, live :(







!- Figures of Speech;

Imagery ; to evoke a mental image " sometimes emotional", figurative language ( to create a pic in your mind).

Irony ; expression of word used to convey an opposite meaning from the usual sense.
( the discrepancy between what is said and what is real meaning ).

A metaphor: a comparison of two dissimilar things which does not use "like" or "as," e.g., "my love is a red, red rose''." .

Personification
Personification means giving human traits to nonhuman or abstract things.

Simile ; a comparison between two unlike things using like or as ,etc . such as '' your eyes are like sparkling diamonds '' .

Paradox: a statement whose two parts seem contradictory yet make sense with more thought.
Or , A paradox is a statement or situation containing apparently contradictory or incompatible elements.

Symbols ; a particular object or event in a poem which acquire thematic value through its function or the way it is presented.

Denotation: the literal meaning of a word; there are no emotions, values, or images associated with denotative meaning. Scientific and mathematical language carries few, if any emotional or connotative meanings.

Connotation: the emotions, values, or images associated with a word. The intensity of emotions or the power of the values and images associated with a word varies. Words connected with religion, politics, and sex tend to have the strongest feelings and images associated with them.

allusion: a brief reference to a person, event, place, or phrase. The writer assumes will recognize the reference.

Overstatement ; exaggeration: making to seem more important than it really is.


!!- Homophony :

Rhyme ; a recurrence of similar ending sounds at the ends of a poetic line / verse.
The occurrence of the same or similar sounds at the end of two or more words)..)
Alliteration: the repetition of the same sound at the beginning of a word, such as the repetition of b sounds in Keats's "beaded bubbles winking at the brim" ("Ode to a Nightingale") or Coleridge's "Five miles meandering in a mazy motion ("Kubla Khan").
A common use for alliteration is emphasis. It occurs in everyday speech in such prhases as "tittle-tattle," "bag and baggage," "bed and board".
Consonance ; repeats consonants, but not the vowels, as in horror-hearer.
Assonance; is the repetition of vowel sounds, as please-niece-ski-tree.
Refrain;
A phrase, line, or group of lines that is repeated throughout a poem, usually after every stanza.

A Pause; is a sign used in musical notation meaning that the note or rest must be held longer than the normal time. This duration is at the conductors or performers discretion.


Types of poetry ;

Lyric Poetry;
Lyric Poetry consists of a poem, such as a sonnet or an ode, that expresses the thoughts and feelings of the poet. The term lyric is now commonly referred to as the words to a song. Lyric poetry does not tell a story which portrays characters and actions. The lyric poet addresses the reader directly, portraying his or her own feeling, state of mind, and perceptions .

Ballad: a relatively short narrative poem, written to be sung, with a simple and dramatic action. The ballads tell of love, death, the supernatural, or a combination of these. the character suddently got an idea.

Free Verse; is a form of Poetry composed of either rhymed or unrhymed lines that have no set fixed metrical pattern.
The early 20th-century poets were the first to write what they called "free verse" which allowed them to break from the formula and rigidity of traditional poetry.

Epic Poems; are long, serious poems that tells the story of a heroic figure. Some of the most famous epic poems are the Iliad.

Sonnets ;
English (or Shakespearean) sonnets are lyric poems that are 14 lines long falling into three coordinate quatrains and a concluding couplet.

Narrative Poetry;
Ballads, epics, and lays are different kinds of narrative poems.

Concrete poetry;
A form of visual poetry where the type-face is laid out to present a pictorial representation of the subject of the poem.

Dramatic poetry; is any poetry that uses the discourse of the characters involved to tell a story or portray a situation.
::*

1-Apostrophe,
A figure of speech in which someone absent or dead or something nonhuman is addressed as if it were alive and present and could reply.

2- Analogy ,
Analogy is a likeness or similarity between things that are otherwise unlike.

3-Elegy
A sad and thoughtful poem lamenting the death of a person.



,

18-12-10, 05:36 PM
+




Definition



Enjambment :- the running over of the sense and grammatical structure from one verse line or couplet to the next without a punctuated pause


29 ,

Glory days
18-12-10, 06:01 PM
.., .. :(

LnOoOsh
18-12-10, 06:30 PM


:D






1

night queen
18-12-10, 07:22 PM
88888888888888

:wow2: :humm::00668:
:545:

<< :ph34r:

miss ranosh
18-12-10, 08:59 PM



3>

18-12-10, 09:35 PM



night queen
18-12-10, 09:36 PM

445 figures of speech
group 3 ------------ There is no frigate like a book
and the group members are
1 Muneera Al-Shlash -----------simile , metaphore and personefication
2 Heba Al- skran imagery and symbols
3 Maha Al-mosa conotation and donetation

the other members please take the rest



LnOoOsh
18-12-10, 11:48 PM








19-12-10, 12:13 AM





...!

1/ The Eagle
2/ The Sick Rose
3/ Chimney Sweepr
4/ There is no Frigate Like a Book
5/ Sonnet 18

...! ^__^
<3

P!NK
19-12-10, 11:22 AM

sonnet 18 :1003:

:1003:

Glory days
21-12-10, 05:35 PM

miss_pinkesh
21-12-10, 06:47 PM
,,

LnOoOsh
21-12-10, 07:10 PM
^

:)

1

ym ym
21-12-10, 07:19 PM







ym ym
21-12-10, 07:36 PM

P!NK
21-12-10, 07:42 PM
sonnet 18

Glory days
21-12-10, 07:55 PM
.. :(

LnOoOsh
21-12-10, 09:41 PM
=)

16 Century = Elizabthen age

Named Elizabthen age according to queen Elizabth .


Also it named " golden age " according to the improvments in that time as :-

1- scientific revelation
2- education improvement
3- renaissance
4- trade
5- technological invocation
6- prosperity
7- literary improvement
8- inventions


1

Glory days
21-12-10, 09:47 PM
^

21-12-10, 10:27 PM

sonnet 18 :1003:

:1003:

http://www.shmoop.com/sonnet-18/symbolism-imagery.html



P!NK
21-12-10, 10:33 PM
:D

21-12-10, 10:39 PM
^
^

118
18

18





Shall I compare thee to a summers day? /
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
What if I were to compare you to a summer day? You are lovelier and more temperate (the perfect temperature)


Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May /
And summers lease hath all too short a date:
Summer's beauty is fragile and can be shaken, and summertime fades away all too quickly:


Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines
/ And often is his gold complexion dimmd;
Sometimes the sun is far too hot, and often it is too cool, dimmed by clouds and shade;


And every fair from fair sometime declines /
By chance or natures changing course untrimmd;
And everything that is beautiful eventually loses its beauty, whether by chance or by the uncontrollable course of nature;


But thy eternal summer shall not fade /
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
But your eternal beauty (or youth) will not fade, nor will your beauty by lost;


Nor shall Death brag thou wanderst in his shade /
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
Nor will Death boast that you wander in his shadow, since you shall grow with time through these sonnets:


So long as men can breathe or eyes can see /
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
For as long as people can breathe and see, this sonnet will live on, and you (and your beauty) with it.---------------------------------

:
Sonnet 18 is arguably the most famous of the sonnets, its opening line competitive with Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? in the long list of Shakespeares quotable quotations. The gender of the addressee is not explicit, but this is the first sonnet after the so-called procreation sonnets (sonnets 1-17), i.e., it apparently marks the place where the poet has abandoned his earlier push to persuade the fair lord to have a child. The first two quatrains focus on the fair lords beauty: the poet attempts to compare it to a summers day, but shows that there can be no such comparison, since the fair lords timeless beauty far surpasses that of the fleeting, inconstant season.

Here the theme of the ravages of time again predominates; we see it especially in line 7, where the poet speaks of the inevitable mortality of beauty: And every fair from fair sometime declines. But the fair lords is of another sort, for it shall not fade the poet is eternalizing the fair lords beauty in his verse, in these eternal lines. Note the financial imagery (summers lease) and the use of anaphora (the repetition of opening words) in lines 6-7, 10-11, and 13-14. Also note that May (line 3) was an early summer month in Shakespeares time, because England did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until 1752.

The poet describes summer as a season of extremes and disappointments. He begins in lines 3-4, where rough winds are an unwelcome extreme and the shortness of summer is its disappointment. He continues in lines 5-6, where he lingers on the imperfections of the summer sun. Here again we find an extreme and a disappointment: the sun is sometimes far too hot, while at other times its gold complexion is dimmed by passing clouds. These imperfections contrast sharply with the poets description of the fair lord, who is more temperate (not extreme) and whose eternal summer shall not fade (i.e., will not become a disappointment) thanks to what the poet proposes in line 12.

In line 12 we find the poets solution how he intends to eternalize the fair lords beauty despite his refusal to have a child. The poet plans to capture the fair lords beauty in his verse (eternal lines), which he believes will withstand the ravages of time. Thereby the fair lords eternal summer shall not fade, and the poet will have gotten his wish. Here we see the poets use of summer as a ****phor for youth, or perhaps beauty, or perhaps the beauty of youth.

But has the poet really abandoned the idea of encouraging the fair lord to have a child? Some scholars suggest that the eternal lines in line 12 have a double meaning: the fair lords beauty can live on not only in the written lines of the poets verse but also in the family lines of the fair lords progeny. Such an interpretation would echo the sentiment of the preceding sonnets closing couplet: But were some child of yours alive that time / You should live twice; in it and in my rhyme. The use of growest also implies an increasing or changing: we can envision the fair lords family lines growing over time, yet this image is not as readily applicable to the lines of the poets verse unless it refers only to his intention to continue writing about the fair lords beauty, his verse thereby growing. On the other hand, line 14 seems to counter this interpretation, the singular this (as opposed to these) having as its most likely antecedent the poets verse, and nothing more

21-12-10, 10:51 PM
ǿ

Glory days
21-12-10, 11:19 PM

http://www.almlf.com/

21-12-10, 11:32 PM


Glory days
22-12-10, 08:25 PM
...


http://www.alm5zn.com/

L_ive
23-12-10, 09:42 PM
441 ..
..

24-12-10, 03:37 PM
441 ..
..


俿


25-12-10, 02:19 PM


25-12-10, 02:28 PM
41

Glory days
25-12-10, 05:47 PM

25-12-10, 06:31 PM
^ :smile13:

,

,

,

Chimney Sweepr


, !



25-12-10, 06:34 PM
ʿ 忿

25-12-10, 06:36 PM
^ ,

25-12-10, 06:39 PM
ʿ

Glory days
25-12-10, 07:21 PM
Chimney Sweepr :s

25-12-10, 07:38 PM
^ 41 :humm:

Glory days
25-12-10, 09:01 PM

26-12-10, 06:10 PM
^ :D:

16th century


,

Glory days
26-12-10, 07:49 PM
8



.. :(

B.A.A
27-12-10, 07:38 PM
..
:(

Glory days
27-12-10, 08:46 PM

Mnolh
31-12-10, 07:04 PM
.....

....

miss_pinkesh
01-01-11, 09:53 PM
,,,

somooo
02-01-11, 06:06 PM

02-01-11, 06:09 PM

Glory days
02-01-11, 09:26 PM
... ... <

..!!!

globalization
03-01-11, 04:12 PM

FeeFoO
04-01-11, 03:19 PM
,,

18 :ph34r:

:smile13: (f)


FeeFoO
04-01-11, 03:35 PM


http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/ParadiseLost.html#Milton

(f)

ym ym
04-01-11, 07:27 PM

ym ym
04-01-11, 07:29 PM

05-01-11, 09:29 PM
忿





06-01-11, 01:30 PM
^_^


><!


miss ranosh
06-01-11, 03:28 PM

_ _ ( )_ _

:D

Glory days
08-01-11, 05:50 AM
....